Contaminated drinking water Ok, it’s the rocks

Picture of Scott Pruitt EPA Administrator

Low levels of radium are common, the radioactive material can be found in rocks, soil, water and of course man made sources such as manufacturing plants, nuclear sites and more. There are no tests available that can measure radium exposure in humans, oddly the negative impact of radium correlates with the level of exposure and if it can’t be measured how convenient is that for large radium producers such as the U.S. Military & big business?

The Cambrian Ordovician Aquifer (COA) provides over 600 million gallons of drinking water to the public daily. The aquifer contains unusually high levels of radium isotopes 228, 226 & 224 which have been known to cause leukemia, cancer and other detrimental health side effects.  By exceeding the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contaminant levels (MCL) for radium millions of people are at risk for severe illnesses.

U.S. Geological scientists have found rocks of the COA are emitting excessive amounts of radium, case solved, the rocks are polluting. I want to extend my personal thanks or kudos to the EPA for identifying those mass polluting rocks. In the near future as millions become sick from radioactive radium exposure, they’ll be told no one is at fault except the rocks & you can’t sue rocks, this is convenience on steroids.

While allegedly talking to CEOs in a private meeting, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt communicated we’re still making America great, go ahead and pollute, it’s the rocks fault for not holding more radium & who cares about the gullible citizenry, we’ll tell them it’s some minority group that’s making them sick, they’ll go for that. Just remember every minute a sucker is born and we have lots of them & by the way I need more stocks, I want to be a billionaire before I leave office.

More can be found at https://www.usgs.gov/news/scientists-home-causes-high-radium-levels-key-midwestern-aquifer and at https://www.nrc.gov/materials/radium.html and at http://www.mass.gov/eohhs/gov/departments/dph/programs/environmental-health/exposure-topics/radiation/radium.html